In Marketing one of the hardest things to achieve is consistency of brand execution across multiple markets. This is especially true when the presentation of your brand in physical retail outlets is a very important part of your marketing mix.

The role of Marketing is to emotionally connect your brand with the customer. From one country to another, customer needs and expectations will vary. Combining this with different cultures, beliefs, language, etc. it is clear that brand engagement needs to be customised. Then add the different retail landscapes into the mix and the level of complexity changes again.

This creates the so called “perfect storm” for local markets to go their own way and shun any attempts by the global brand teams to establish a coordinated and synergistic approach to retail investment. Does this sound familiar?

“The three rules of marketing; everyone has an opinion, every opinion is different and every opinion is right”

So what are the main barriers facing global and regional teams who are trying to implement regional programs and how do you overcome them? Here are the five main roadblocks, that we are sure you will have heard of before:

1.The centre doesn’t understand my market

Regional retail investment programs often fail before they are started. The reason is that not enough data and corresponding insights have been gathered to ensure there is a clear understanding of the differing retail environments that are to be invested in. It is imperative therefore that this weakness is addressed. Consider undertaking retail outlet assessments and using augmented reality tools to test how certain concepts may work across markets.

“Collective wisdom will always outshine individual judgement. This has never been truer than in shopper marketing.”

2.”This program won’t work in my market”

The challenge is that the focus for the program ends up on the materials being designed. Each market looks at the materials being proposed in context of their own retail landscape and this is when they see issues. The focus needs to be switched to desired outcomes. The objective is all about delivering the most compelling and immersive experience possible to the customer to influence purchase behaviour. Develop a Purchase Decision Journey that connects every touch point into a consistent retail experience for key outlet types. If everyone can become aligned around the journey and the desired outcomes, then gaining commitment to the regional program is so much easier.

3.”There is no ability to customise the materials”

In many cases, materials are designed without a clear definition of their exact role from the customer’s perspective. This also impacts the way they are deployed. In addition, materials are often looked at in isolation of each other. Establish a retail investment kit for each specific outlet type. Build in customisation so that materials can be “flexed” to deliver a specific customer experience that meets specific brand, product or outlet objectives. This will remove the need for many local markets to have unique alterations.

4.”I can source it cheaper”

Invariably, when this position is put forward, it is more often than not a comparison of apples and oranges. The materials being compared are not to the same specification.

For an objective like-for-like assessment to be undertaken of the various potential sources of supply, there is a need for accurate and full availability of technical specifications. If a full technical specification is not available, then this claim has absolutely no validation.

5.”I need to buy locally”

Having a local source of supply is usually put forward for two reasons; lower cost and speed of response. Once you have full technical specifications you need to engage with a supplier who can provide full flexibility on supply. A supplier who can provide a supply chain model that meets the local market needs and can be adapted as requirements change. You need a supplier who can arrange offshore production (for lowest cost), local manufacture or a combination of the two.

“For a regional retail investment program to succeed, you need to switch the focus from the materials being developed to the customer experiences that you wish to deliver.”

So in summary, the format for running regional retail investment programs has to be fundamentally adapted to include the following 5 key criteria:

  1. Market insights on the differing retail environments
  2. A clear and aligned Purchase Decision Journey for each outlet type
  3. Customisable retail outlet investment kits
  4. Detailed technical specifications for every item
  5. A flexible supply model that can support offshore and local sourcing

By following these principles, many of the challenges of implementing regional or even global retail investment programs can be removed.

If you would like more information on how LeanPie can transform your shopper experience supply chain, please feel free to contact David at david.newberry@leanpie.com

Author: David

Love all things marketing | Lived on 4 continents | Author, well kind of | Tech co-founder, second time around | Love adventure travel, cycling and swimming

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